Google Sinks To New Low In Aiding China’s Regime To Monitor Online Searches

Image: beatcraft

Google’s widely condemned collaboration with the totalitarian government of China has reached new depths on the recent disclosure that its ‘in progress project-Dragonfly’ (specially designed to allow the Chinese state unprecedented degree of censorship and surveillance) will enable the authorities there to link online searches by users to their personal cell or landline numbers. Allowing the Chinese regime to monitor people’s queries, an invaluable resource if you are in the business of fighting against dissent, free-speech or ideologically corruput thinking. It’s every dictatorships dream technonology and has been made possible by the good folks of Google. Awesome job guys!

More at this excellent report from The Intercept https://theintercept.com/2018/09/14/google-china-prototype-links-searches-to-phone-numbers/

 

 

Time To Find Another Digital Home For Our Voice On Tibet?

The long anguished discussions across the internet on the demise of the Blog seem to be realizing the concerns they articulated, with the rise and dominance of social-media platforms folks have gotten used to bite-sized, image-driven consumption. Seems there’s just too little time around to read word rich posts.

We’ve noticed that dynamic and mindful of where best, and how, our outreach on Tibet is manifest, we’re giving thought to maintaining this resource. Launched in 2009 it’s become a serious and forceful  voice for Tibet, breaking stories, launching campaigns and exposing issues others have feared to engage with.

Outspoken, but always coming from a place of integrity we’ve been dedicated to the just cause of Tibet, in solidarity with the resistance and political aspirations of Tibetans inside occupied Tibet. Yet no matter the awesome committment. expertise and knowledge that maintains and creates this site, there’s a digital tide at work, the flow of which means less exposure and engagement.

Given that the purpose of our presence here is to reach out to the many who know little of Tibet and the plight of the Tibetan people we need to give sober assessment to its continuance, especially when there are other more active and populated platforms.

 

Tibet Activists Kidnap Emoji As Ransom For Approval Of Tibetan Flag

As we’ve reported. people using cell-phones, tablets and laptops are being denied the choice to include in their tweets, facbook posts, instagram comments, and elsewhere across the digi-verse, an emoji of the Tibetan flag. The reason is due to a decision reached by the Unicode Consortium (UC), an umbrella organization comprised of major vendors such as Google, Apple, Twitter, Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Mozilla and others, who vote an approval for the emojis we use. No endorsement, no emoji. Now it’s probably no accident that many of the organizations who get to authorize on these have commercial relations with China, and we all know what the regime of that country thinks of the Tibetan flag. Right?

We are curently sending a direct appeal to all the major voters within the UC detailing why they should approve an emoji of Tibet’s flag. Not least of all because to deny Tibetans around the world, and those who support the Tibetan cause for freedom, the option to display that emblem in their communincations on social media is a flagrant denial of freedom-of-expression. Of course such lobbying may or may not realize a change of position from such organizations, and for sure it will prove a long haul. With that in mind until such time as Tibet’s national emblem is accorded an emoji we are hereby issuing notice that we’ve hijacked the Sunrise Over Mountains emoji 🌄 which we shall be using as substitute symbol for the Tibetan flag. Sharing as it does with the Tibetan emblem the central feature of the sun rising above the mountain we think it’s an apposite symbol.

In keeping with principles of compassion and non-violence we shall make every effort to ensure that the kidnapped emoji is comfortable and in good health. However it’s release is entirely contigent upon the Unicode Consortium and its multi-national corporations meeting in full our demand that they approve an emoji for the flag of Tibet.

Meanwhile we shall be inviting our friends across social-media and those supporting human-rights, Tibet and free-speech to join us in using this emoji to represent the Tibetan flag.

Disappointed That @unicode Has No Emoji Of Tibet’s Flag

Image:archivenet

Useful communication, or annoying fad? Could be that emojis aren’t your thing, but they are an important and increasing method of communication across social media, especially Twitter.

There’s emojis for many flags of the world and yet this is the #emoji –> 🏴󠁣󠁮󠀹󠀱󠁿 which the Unicode Consortium (the authority which approves and cauthorizes emoji) has decided for the Tibetan flag!

We regard this as censorship, which no doubt greatly pleases the Chinese regime. Which is why today we appealed to the Unicode Consortium to approve and create an emoji of Tibet’s flag.

Our statement can be read: HERE

If you would like to see the Tibetan flag as an emoji which can then be easily included on posts acoss social media then contact Unicode Consortium via Twitter @unicode or by email at human4@unicode.org

Viewing Tibetan Culture Through A Communist Chinese Lens

Pema Tseden’s Films Freeze Out The Facts

There is no untainted cinematic insight into the suppression and abuses inside Tibet, no full exposure of the harrowing realities of forced sterilizations, the destruction of a nomadic culture through a policy of re-settlement, nor any detailed documentary recording the environmental pillage. Which is transforming once verdant pastures and forests into a lunar-like landscape, with convoys of trucks heading back to communist China with their booty of timber and minerals. The transformation of Tibetan towns into yet another Chinese concrete facsimile, complete with gaudy excess and a range of previously unknown erosive social problems, continues apace, un-documented. No genuine independent film-making is of course possible under such a repressive totalitarian regime, one desperate to convince the world that Tibet is undergoing positive change, thanks, we are asked to accept, to the seemingly compassionate rule of communist China.

Unfortunately we’re denied any unbiased evidence which would reveal the progress claimed by the communist regime, only the testimony of some supposedly impartial western academics and politicians, who appear to specialise in an uncritical acceptance of any official propaganda that Beijing presents them. We then have seemingly unlimited amounts of Chinese films on Tibet, mostly designed for television broadcast, with sickly images of Tibetans dancing and singing in praise of yet another bumper-harvest, due no doubt to China’s enlightened agricultural policies. These are transparent disinformation with actors supposedly dressed in traditional Tibetan costumes, color coded to match the red and yellow branding of the communist Chinese flag! Barely able to move due to the overly abundant costume jewellery and obligatory fixed smile, set against images of modernity Chinese-style, like a crude layer of make-up they conceal a more disturbing reality.

More recently a subtler form of propaganda has emerged, more cinematic, carefully crafted to present some illusion of balance and independence, yet the underlying message remains the same, albeit diluted and sophisticated. A good example is the latest film ‘Jinpa’ currently misleading and manipulating audiences at the Venice Film Festival. Directed by Mr Pema Tseden , of course being an obedient and loyal citizen of communist China this Tibetan also has a Chinese name too, Wanma Caidan.

Like his previous works this film is a slick production filmed inside Tibet, while aesthetically his films have charm and nuance they cynically misdirect the viewer away from the brutal realities of life for Tibetans under Chinese rule. The alluring personal narratives and stunning landscapes he plays around with are an approved sleight-of-hand which assiduously avoid the erosion and oppression of Tibetan culture. Yet such corrosion is a direct result of China’s imperialistic aggression which has deliberately targeted Tibetan culture for over six decades.

It is a reality which the Director surely knows dare not speak its name, his films clearly meet the propaganda requirements imposed by the Chinese regime, in that context he is a willing and conscious collaborator. Perhaps that explains his insistence that: “…filmmakers are starting to more accurately capture the essence of life in Tibet. They are starting to let go of the old stereotypes.” SOURCE

Those who see his films at festival or art-houses need to be mindful of this. Sure his work can be selectively interpreted as offering “.. an uncompromising view of difficulty in modern society. They’re not deliberately provocative, but they also don’t offer us comfortable resolutions.”. A view presented by one Robert Barnet of Columbia University, top grade for nuanced euphemism there! However the ‘difficulties’ of forced-labor camps, torture, ethnic-‘cleansing’ and cultural erosion do not feature in the cinematic vision of Pema Tseden. While the ‘modern society’ (translating as occupied and oppressed Tibet and its culture) is never truly explored and it’s important to remind yourself that the work of Pema Tseden would not be made public without the authorization of the Chinese regime. in consideration of that we need to question what is it about his films that receives such approval?